Madame Butterfly

Un Bel Di Vedremo (Puccini). 2008. Oil on canvas. 60" x 36".

Un Bel Di Vedremo (Puccini). 2008. Oil on canvas. 60″ x 36″.

 

Somiglio la dea della luna,
la piccola dea della luna
che scende la notte
dal ponte del ciel.

Un bel dì vedremo..
È venuto!
Io non gli scendo incontro.
Io no. Mi metto là
sul ciglio del colle e aspetto,
e aspetto gran tempo
e non mi pesa
la lunga attesa.

 

À la recherche du temps perdu

Ristorante We. 2006. Oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches.

Ristorante We. 2006. Oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches.

“I had the most rudimentary sense of existence, such as may lurk and flicker in the depths of an animal’s consciousness; I was more destitute than the cave-dweller; but then the memory–not yet of the place in which I was, but of various other places where I had lived and might now very possibly be–would come like a rope let down from the heaven to draw me up out of the abyss of not-being, from which I could never have escaped by myself: in a flash I would traverse centuries of civilisations, and out of the blurred glimpse of oil-lamps, then of shirts with turned-down collars, would gradually piece together the original components of my ego.” — Marcel Proust. “In Search of Lost Time

Origins: Networks

Emerging out of the Mahler series and my developing fascination with social networks analysis is this curious piece on clusters & chromatic composition.

Origins: Networks. Oil on canvas.

Origins: Networks. Oil on canvas.

Good love.

“Good Love.” 2012. Oil on canvas. 3 by 4 12″ sq panel. Commissioned work. Private collection.

“Good Love.” 2012. Oil on canvas. 3 by 4 12″ sq panel. Commissioned work. Private collection.

White is the unifying theme in this painting: White as the new black (compare the earlier Callas portraits to this and the last five paintings).

The white negative space plays with the inner petals to unify the composition on one hand, and to achieve a low level of abstraction on the other. The stigma and anthers were reduced to two hues to bring a higher level of simplicity.

The point is to reduce something that is truly organic into its more basic, geometric elements. Not unlike early Mondrian.

A note of interest in color use: limited to three principal colors of a Renaissance palette: Venetian red, Naples yellow and burnt umber.